Xoi Vo (Mung Bean Coated Sticky Rice)

  • Preparation time: 20 minutes
  • Cook time: 60 minutes

“Xoi vo” is an indispensable cuisine in Vietnamese tradition, as it appears in many ritual ceremonies, especially weddings and “le day thang”- a celebration of the baby’s first month old. If you plan to make Xoi Vo, soak the rice the night before to avoid long waiting time.

Xoi Vo (Mung Bean Coated Sticky Rice) Photo: @lenguyenhuongtra

Detailed Instructions

Ingredients

  • 2 cup of sweet rice
  • 2 cup mung beans (peeled or dehull and split)
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2/3 cup coconut milk
  • 2 tsp oil

Preparation

  1. Wash the sticky rice and soak for 8-12 hours with water. If you wish to shorten the soaking time, use warm water. Wash mung beans and soak overnight separately.
  2. After soaking, wash both rice and bean carefully and set apart. Add 1/2 tsp salt to the bean and steam until well cooked, soft and fluffy (you can also use an electric cooker to cook the bean). Divide into two portions.
  3. Mix one bean portion with the washed rice and add 2 tsp oil, 1/2 tsp salt. Steam this mixture under medium heat until cooked. Add in 2/3 cup of coconut milk. Set the cooked rice on a plate to cool.
  4. Grind the other bean portion coarsely with 2 tbsp of sugar. Add to the cooked rice and steam for another 5 minutes. Set the finished rice on a plate and serve warm or cold.
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